29 October 2020

New Salt Caves and the Growing Need for Old Therapy

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought more attention to boosting our immune systems and treating respiratory illnesses— just a few areas that salt therapy has treated for thousands of years. It is said that Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, was the first to discover its antibacterial nature. While the world has changed dramatically in 2020, proponents of salt therapy are ready to help.

Salt therapy, also known as halotherapy (Halios Greek for salt), has is experiencing a resurgence in popularity due to its overall wellness benefits. Essentially the equivalent of spending time in the salty sea air, the minerals and negative ions in a salt cave can recreate the absorption of three days at the beach in under an hour.

The origin of salt therapy can be found in the salt mines and caves of Eastern Europe and Russia. When they found that salt mine workers, as well as people that had hid in salt mines during during WWII, seemed to have thriving health. Most notably, the famous Wieliczka Salt Mine in Poland, which was the first health resort offering natural, underground, salt brine baths and inhalation therapy, proved more effective in the treatment of asthma than other inhalations. Since its opening in 1807, with the help of the modern medicine and research, the benefits of salt therapy has grown across the world, and has finally reached the United States. Salt therapy rooms, or salt caves, are a growing trend for additions to their spas, resorts, gyms, hotels, fitness center and even private homes.

Salt therapy works using the negative ion concentration that lowers the percentage of harmful bacteria in the air and promotes quicker healing. Apart from sodium chloride, the air in the salt cave can have up to 84 other minerals, depending on the kind of salt. (Table salt doesn’t quite offer the same.) All these minerals saturate the air you breathe by using a method that grinds salt in to “micro-particles” using a halogenerator to blow them in to the air for direct contact (dry salt therapy), or a method that mimics the Wieliczka Mine by gently saturating the air using salt brine trickled down a water fountain and using humid absorption (wet salt therapy).

A growing popularity of halotherapy in wellness routines shows people have found relief from a variety of conditions. From all levels of respiratory conditions to even the most sensitive of skin conditions, the evidence is easily found on a simple internet search. Similar to the popularity of the Himalayan salt lamps, many believe they the reap emotional benefits from the negative ions in the rooms that offset the positive ions caused by pollution, electronics and stress.

Regardless of method or belief, one thing is consistent, spas are creating a luxurious environments for a guest where they can simultaneously heal their muscles with a massage and respiratory illness with a salt cave. The rooms are very sterile, filled with antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral salt & minerals.

Although they embrace the technology of halo generators of dry salt therapy, SaltCave ProDesign, with their engineers and builders in Poland, have specialized in wet salt therapy using “graduation towers”, which are essentially water fountains that bounce the recirculating salt brine in to the calibrated moisture of a closed cave environment. Beata Huzarska Hatley, owner, grew up in Poland (and experienced the effects of Chernobyl’s effects) with a family heavily involved in salt mining. Her father designed and build coal mines during the Communist era and saw the difference in the health of the miners of salt caves versus others.

We’ve built salt caves all over the world using the inspiration of the Wielisczka Mine, which was a short drive from her childhood home. “There are thousands of salt caves built all over the world, and we are proud to bring our specialized team to the United States.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought more attention to boosting our immune systems and treating respiratory illnesses— just a few areas that salt therapy has treated for thousands of years. It is said that Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, was the first to discover its antibacterial nature. While the world has changed dramatically in 2020, proponents of salt therapy are ready to help.

Salt therapy, also known as halotherapy (Halios Greek for salt), has is experiencing a resurgence in popularity due to its overall wellness benefits. Essentially the equivalent of spending time in the salty sea air, the minerals and negative ions in a salt cave can recreate the absorption of three days at the beach in under an hour.

The origin of salt therapy can be found in the salt mines and caves of Eastern Europe and Russia. When they found that salt mine workers, as well as people that had hid in salt mines during during WWII, seemed to have thriving health. Most notably, the famous Wieliczka Salt Mine in Poland, which was the first health resort offering natural, underground, salt brine baths and inhalation therapy, proved more effective in the treatment of asthma than other inhalations. Since its opening in 1807, with the help of the modern medicine and research, the benefits of salt therapy has grown across the world, and has finally reached the United States. Salt therapy rooms, or salt caves, are a growing trend for additions to their spas, resorts, gyms, hotels, fitness center and even private homes.

Salt therapy works using the negative ion concentration that lowers the percentage of harmful bacteria in the air and promotes quicker healing. Apart from sodium chloride, the air in the salt cave can have up to 84 other minerals, depending on the kind of salt. (Table salt doesn’t quite offer the same.) All these minerals saturate the air you breathe by using a method that grinds salt in to “micro-particles” using a halogenerator to blow them in to the air for direct contact (dry salt therapy), or a method that mimics the Wieliczka Mine by gently saturating the air using salt brine trickled down a water fountain and using humid absorption (wet salt therapy).

A growing popularity of halotherapy in wellness routines shows people have found relief from a variety of conditions. From all levels of respiratory conditions to even the most sensitive of skin conditions, the evidence is easily found on a simple internet search. Similar to the popularity of the Himalayan salt lamps, many believe they the reap emotional benefits from the negative ions in the rooms that offset the positive ions caused by pollution, electronics and stress.

Regardless of method or belief, one thing is consistent, spas are creating a luxurious environments for a guest where they can simultaneously heal their muscles with a massage and respiratory illness with a salt cave. The rooms are very sterile, filled with antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral salt & minerals.

Although they embrace the technology of halo generators of dry salt therapy, SaltCave ProDesign, with their engineers and builders in Poland, have specialized in wet salt therapy using “graduation towers”, which are essentially water fountains that bounce the recirculating salt brine in to the calibrated moisture of a closed cave environment. Beata Huzarska Hatley, owner, grew up in Poland (and experienced the effects of Chernobyl’s effects) with a family heavily involved in salt mining. Her father designed and build coal mines during the Communist era and saw the difference in the health of the miners of salt caves versus others.

We’ve built salt caves all over the world using the inspiration of the Wielisczka Mine, which was a short drive from her childhood home. “There are thousands of salt caves built all over the world, and we are proud to bring our specialized team to the United States.”

Respiratory illnesses will continue to be a focal point during the pandemic, and a beautiful, salt cave can help ensure your spa can serve guests’ needs long after the pandemic.